Category: Hybrids

Hybrids part 96

a tale in weekly parts

(formerly Albert and Jarvis)

Albert, Jarvis, Trevor, Eos and Dawn

In episodes 1-88, Albert and Jarvis told the story of a bitek construct that had been in the lives of the Grahamson family for three generations. Appearing in the form of a shepherd's hut (Jarvis) and its elderly occupant (Albert), an earlier experiment had resulted in the birth of Aloysius, a non-manifesting human/bitek hybrid. Alice and Alex, the two children that Aloysius had fathered with his wife, Magdalen, displayed strong bitek capabilities from an early age, though Alice was significantly more precocious than her younger brother. Albert and Jarvis nurtured and enhanced these capabilities through many adventures until the point where, to prevent a global catastrophe, the two needed to act together. The action needed more power than the two possessed. To produce stonger hybrids, Alex's seed was used to produce a young in a distantly related hybrid female in another dimension, while Alice was impregnated using her own bitek components. Albert and Jarvis absented themselves from the lives of the Grahamsons to allow Alice's pregnancy to progress in a safe, normal environment.
You can see the full story so far at this link.


Episode 96

A week is a very long time when you’re only ten years old – even if you just happen to be the most advanced human/bitek hybrid ever produced. For seven days after his birthday, the part of Zak that was a ten-year-old human boy, probably no more than forty percent of his persona, over-rode the older and wiser portion as well as the logic-driven bitek areas of his brain to produce exactly the level of excitement that you would expect to see from an intelligent, imaginative pre-teen.

And, despite their very best efforts, it was driving everyone else in the house: his mother, his uncle and his grandparents slowly but inexorably to that state of near-dementia that all parents know only too well.

Never having been a parent himself; not in the accepted, conventional sense of the word, anyway; Albert found the whole episode highly entertaining.

Finally, to just about everyone’s relief, the day arrived. Zak was up and about before 6am – a feat he never usually managed, even for such important occasions as Christmas. He spent the next two hours phasing between three bedrooms and Jarvis, waiting for someone… anyone to awaken and join him in his near-delirious state.

Albert was the first to surface. When he saw Zak standing there, jumping up and down as if in some kind of frenzy, he said just two short words. Zak was familiar with the second of the two words and knew not only what it meant, but also what it implied. The first word was new to him but when coupled with the second, he quickly picked up the gist of what Albert was trying to convey and phased off somewhere else.

Alice came to just before eight o’clock and saw her son standing at the foot of her bed.

“How long have you been standing there?” she asked.

“I don’t know how to answer that question,” he replied, “time is such a strange thing.”

“You can certainly say that again,” Alice said, immediately followed by, “on second thoughts – don’t. But listen. If you think normal time is weird, you ain’t seen nothing yet!”

“What time can we go?”

“When everyone’s ready and not a second sooner. You really do need to learn patience, Zak.”

“Tried it once, remember? Dead boring. Fortnite’s fun, have you tried it?” Alice shook her head. Having just woken, her facial features were still half asleep, so it was impossible to tell whether the head-shaking was a negative reply or exasperation.

If he noticed, Zak didn’t care. “Shall I go and wake Granny and Grandpa?”

“Not if you like being alive.”

“What about Alex?”

“Moreso.”

“What can I do? I’m bored. I want to go, now!”

“You can go and set the table for breakfast. Will you do that?”

“Of course.

“But, Zak?”

“What?”

“Do it like a normal ten-year-old boy.”

“But that’ll take ages.”

“Yup. And Zak…”

“What?”

“Don’t go making a lot of noise doing it, just to wake everybody up.”

“What makes you think I’d do that?”

“Because I know you, young man, and because it’s exactly what I would have done at your age. In fact, I did. And I’ve still got the emotional scars to remind me.”

“Okay, I suppose.”

“Good lad.”

As every experienced mother knows, there are occasions when you ask for certain behaviour, not because you believe it’s going to happen, but because it’s part of the game. You have to ask for that behaviour, in a way that suggests you expect to see it. It’s almost a sacred duty. Just as your child is under an absolute requirement to do exactly the opposite of what you ask. In the words of the immortal bard, “‘Twas ever thus”. In the words of the immoral Bart, “Bite me!”

In less time than it takes to boil an egg (okay, we are talking spectacularly hard-boiled – it was nearly twenty minutes) everyone was around the dining table eating breakfast.

Not everyone was wearing their most cheerful face.

Zak was. Wearing his most cheerful face, that is. So, interestingly, was Albert. But then; he hadn’t been awakened by the clattering of crockery in the kitchen.

Quite soon, the five were tucking into what could only be described as a celebration of cholesterol: eggs, bacon, tomato, sausages, mushrooms, black pudding and hash browns – all fried in butter with a generous pile of baked beans on the side.

“Albert,” Madge said, “this trip you’re taking Zak on; is it for all of us?”

“Just Alex, Alice and Zak this time,” Albert replied, “I can get away with transporting humans through space and time – although you’ll remember how tired you were for days after your last trip – but not across dimensions. It could leave you with damage that is beyond medical science to repair.”

“What about me?” Al asked, “I’m not fully human – as my darling wife keeps reminding me—”

“If you think you’re going swanning around dimensions while I sit here twiddling my thumbs, Aloysius Grahamson, you’ve got another think coming!” Madge bellowed.

“Well, I think that answers your question, Al, don’t you?” Albert said with a grin.

“Hmmph!”

“Well,” Albert said, rising from the table [no, not levitation – he stood up. Although…], “if we’re all ready?”

Alex, Alice and Zak stood and moved to stand with Albert. Al started to move his chair in preparation. “SIT!” Madge commanded. Al remained seated while the others shimmered, reappearing with broad grins and, bizarrely, dressed – well, bizarrely.

“Can I tell Granny and Grandpa all about it?” Zak asked his mother.

“Of course,” she replied. Zak ran over and wrapped his ten-year-old arms around Madge, planted a kiss on her cheek and shook hands with Al.

“You lot are like dogs,” Al said, “you’ve hardly been gone ten seconds, but you’re greeting us like you’ve been away for days!”

“Weeks, actually, Grandpa. Speaking of dogs, though, where are they?”

“Blessed if I know, Zak. The three of them ran outside as soon as we got up. They’ll be back again when they’re hungry. Meanwhile, tell us about your birthday trip.”

“Well,” Zak began…

Hybrids part 95

a tale in weekly parts

(formerly Albert and Jarvis)

Albert, Jarvis, Trevor, Eos and Dawn

In episodes 1-88, Albert and Jarvis told the story of a bitek construct that had been in the lives of the Grahamson family for three generations. Appearing in the form of a shepherd's hut (Jarvis) and its elderly occupant (Albert), an earlier experiment had resulted in the birth of Aloysius, a non-manifesting human/bitek hybrid. Alice and Alex, the two children that Aloysius had fathered with his wife, Magdalen, displayed strong bitek capabilities from an early age, though Alice was significantly more precocious than her younger brother. Albert and Jarvis nurtured and enhanced these capabilities through many adventures until the point where, to prevent a global catastrophe, the two needed to act together. The action needed more power than the two possessed. To produce stonger hybrids, Alex's seed was used to produce a young in a distantly related hybrid female in another dimension, while Alice was impregnated using her own bitek components. Albert and Jarvis absented themselves from the lives of the Grahamsons to allow Alice's pregnancy to progress in a safe, normal environment.
You can see the full story so far at this link.


Episode 95

“Mum,” Alex said, “how did you arrive at that conclusion from what Albert just said?”

“Simple. He said, and tell me if I get this wrong, Albert, that the Eddies; this ‘dark matter’ the scientists talk about; these things that seem to be all-powerful and control just about everything there is, are subject to laws from a higher authority. That authority can only be God. Am I right, Albert?”

“Your reasoning is good, Madge,” Albert said, “but you start from a belief that a creator-god exists. The fact is—”

“Your opinion is, you mean.”

“Okay, I’ll play along for a while. Our understanding is that the Eddies were in a state of permanent boredom and making a total nuisance of themselves. The multiverse in all its dimensions developed out of a need for the highest authority to give them something to do, to direct their energies to something vaguely productive. It set off something like a firecracker, each explosion of which was a Big Bang.”

“So this higher authority – what do you call it?”

“We don’t know its name. Even the Eddies won’t ever say it out loud.”

“This is all beginning to sound rather familiar. Anyway, it’s probably easier, rather than always calling it the highest authority, that we give it a name – a sort of shorthand. Just to save us using seven syllables; we can make do with one or two.”

“What did you have in mind, Madge?”

“Oh, I don’t know. Maybe something like Deus, Theos, Allah, Jehovah. Tell you what; let’s stick with God. It’s short, pithy, and everyone here knows what you mean.”

“I see what you did there, Madge,” Albert said after some thought, “but all of those names are applied to a deity that expects, if not demands, obedience and worship.”

“Worship is our natural response to a loving God,” Madge said, “as for obedience – aren’t you doing exactly that by accepting the Eddies’ statement that going back and re-running my kids’ upgrades is against the law?”

“I need to take that away and think about it, Madge.”

“You do that. I’m going to go and make dinner.” Madge again left the room.

Alice wrapped her arm around Zak’s shoulder and nuzzled closer to him. Dropping her head to his ear, she half-whispered, “Is there anything special you’d like to do for your birthday?”

“Actually, there is,” Zak replied, “I should dearly like to meet Zara. After all, if she’s to be my wife, it would be nice if I could get to know her and maybe become friends, first.”

“I’m not sure I like all this,” Al said.

“All what?” Alice asked.

“All this Zak marrying his cousin malarkey.”

“Second cousin, Granddad,” Zak corrected him.

“It’s not the possible incest implications I’m worried about—”

“Well, I am!” Madge shouted from the kitchen.

Speaking very quietly, Al said, “Ignore her,” then after flinching, continued at his normal volume, “I’m not comfortable with the whole idea of arranged marriage. I thought that had been outlawed a long time ago.”

“Can you go see if your grandma needs any help in the kitchen, please, Zak?” Albert said.

“You want to talk about me without me hearing? That’s not very nice, is it?”

“What I want to do, Zak, and I know your mum will agree with me, is to make sure that you can decide things for yourself, without being confused by opinions that are not based on solid information.”

Albert cast an accusing look at Al, who responded by raising his eyebrows, pointing to his chest and silently mouthing, “Me?”

“Go on, Zak,” Alice said, “do as Albert says.”

“Okay, Mum,” Zak said, skipping into the kitchen.

“Aloysius,” Albert continued, “firstly, who said anything about marriage? It is necessary that Zak and Zara have a child together, not that they marry or live together as a couple. Alex, would you care to tell your father how Zara was conceived?”

“Hmmph,” Alex replied sullenly, “While I was asleep, Jarvis, or maybe the Eddies, made me have one of those dreams – you know the sort I mean – and they took a sample of my seed. Exactly how they impregnated Kris I have no idea, but I certainly got nothing out of it.”

“Except a son,” Albert said, “Alice – how did you come to have Zak?”

Alice turned to look at her father. “The Eddies manipulated my DNA, Dad. Zak is pretty much my clone.”

“Well, not exactly a clone, but that’s near enough for now. So you see, Al, there is no real need for marriage or for the possible incest you’re worried about. When the time is right, the Eddies will tell us how they plan to do it; to produce the child they need.”

“And you’ll meekly go along with it?”

“Probably.”

“Why probably?”

“Because if what they suggest seems in our view to be against the best interests of either of the kids, we’ll ask for a rethink and a conference.”

“And they’ll grant that?”

“Probably.”

“Again. Why probably?”

“Because we’re in uncharted waters here, Al. There’s no precedent to fall back on. We’re all playing it by ear.”

“Anyway. So you’re telling me that neither Zak nor Zara were produced what-I-call naturally?”

“Too risky.”

“Risky? How?”

“You know how babies are made, don’t you?”

“Of course I do. For God’s sake, do you think I’m a child? Naive? A simpleton?”

“What I think doesn’t matter, Al. The fact is that we needed to produce Zara, not from the chance union of an untested egg and a random sperm from millions; it had to be the right egg and the right sperm.”

“So Zak and Zara were designer babies?”

“I don’t much like the term, but yes, absolutely they were. They had to be.”

“Can I ask why?”

“Because, Son, they had to be absolutely right, DNA-wise, to produce the perfect offspring.”

“That’s immoral.”

“I can understand why you’d think that, but bear one thing in mind.”

“What’s that?”

“The fate of the world; the future existence of the human race depends on that child being perfect. Would you put a batch of random pieces of metal and plastic together and expect it to fly you to the stars?”

“Of course not.”

“Then how can you expect a randomly produced human to carry out this task?”

“Training?”

“No. Not possible.”

“Bu—”

Al stopped as Zak came back into the room.

“So, Mum,” he said, “do I get to meet Zara?”

“As soon as we can arrange it, Zak. As soon as we can arrange it.”

Zak looked at Albert and raised an eyebrow.

“Next week, Lad,” Albert said.

“Thanks, Albert,” Zak said. He ran to his mother, hugged her and said excitedly, “I’m going on an adventure!”

“Yes, my love. We all are.”

Hybrids part 94

a tale in weekly parts

(formerly Albert and Jarvis)

Albert, Jarvis, Trevor, Eos and Dawn

In episodes 1-88, Albert and Jarvis told the story of a bitek construct that had been in the lives of the Grahamson family for three generations. Appearing in the form of a shepherd's hut (Jarvis) and its elderly occupant (Albert), an earlier experiment had resulted in the birth of Aloysius, a non-manifesting human/bitek hybrid. Alice and Alex, the two children that Aloysius had fathered with his wife, Magdalen, displayed strong bitek capabilities from an early age, though Alice was significantly more precocious than her younger brother. Albert and Jarvis nurtured and enhanced these capabilities through many adventures until the point where, to prevent a global catastrophe, the two needed to act together. The action needed more power than the two possessed. To produce stonger hybrids, Alex's seed was used to produce a young in a distantly related hybrid female in another dimension, while Alice was impregnated using her own bitek components. Albert and Jarvis absented themselves from the lives of the Grahamsons to allow Alice's pregnancy to progress in a safe, normal environment.
You can see the full story so far at this link.


Episode 94

“Now you’re all at it,” Al complained.

“All at what, o father of mine?” Alice asked, her tone a study in sweetness and innocence.

“You know exactly what, young lady. Bloody shimmering!”

Albert looked Al squarely in the eye. “There are things we need to do, Al; things that take time. To carry out Zak’s enhancements needed between four and six days.”

“And you’re telling me that with all your power you can’t do it faster?”

“I’m telling you that to do it safely, without any risk to the boy, needs a minimum of four days. In the end, it took five. Now, you have a choice, Al. Either we phase out of time, do what has to be done and return at the same point in time; what you so eloquently refer to as ‘shimmering’, or we lock ourselves away for the five days it took. Your choice.”

“So you’ve been away for five days?”

“We’ve been away for five days.”

And what exactly happened in those five days?”

“Would you like me to have the Eddies update your comms node and transmit full details to you?”

“I would, yes.” Al blanched. “Oh my God! The poor kid.”

Madge looked worried. “What just happened?” she asked.

“I’ve just been bloody upgraded before I could get the word yes out.”

“And?”

“And now I know that they’ve made young Zak the same as Alice and Alex.”

“More so,” Albert said, “better, stronger, faster.”

“Don’t tell me; it cost six million dollars, lol.”

Alex looked at his father. “Don’t try to be down with the kids, Dad. It’s not you.”

“What are you talking about?”

“I think he means stick with ‘ha ha ha’,” Madge said.

“Way to spoil a joke, dear heart. Meanwhile, what does Zak think of all this?”

“I consider myself the most fortunate of souls, Granddad.”

“How so?”

“Most people go through life searching for their purpose. All the religions in the world try to answer the question on everyone’s lips, ‘why are we here?’ That’s why they were invented.” Madge, who had been brought up in the Catholic faith, scowled. Zak continued, “Many people, maybe even most people, die never having found a purpose. I am fortunate in that I know my purpose.”

“And that is?”

“I am to join with Zara, who is my second cousin, and we will have a child. That child will be strong enough to do what is needed to stop humanity destroying itself.”

“Yes, yes, yes. I know about all that. What I don’t know is when is all that supposed to happen?” Madge asked.

“That’s a difficult question to answer, Grandma.”

“Because you don’t know!”

“Because of the way—”

Albert interrupted Zak. “We’ve told you before, Madge. Time is an allusion.”

“And black is white and up is down. You’ll be telling me next that heaven and hell are the same.”

“Inasmuch as I question their existence, they are,” Albert replied.

Madge stormed out of the room in a grade A huff!

“How old were you when they upgraded you, Alex?” Zak asked.

“About your age. But I didn’t have the preparation you’ve had.”

“We’re refining our methods as we go on,” the family heard Jarvis say, “we did better with Alex than with his sister, and we’ve come on a long way with Zak.”

“Are you saying my son won’t have the adjustment issues we had?”

“I’m saying that we hope and expect that his transition will be smoother.”

“How is my cousin doing?” Zak asked.

“Yeah,” Alex added, “how’s my daughter? Whom, incidentally, I haven’ yet seen!”

“We’ll arrange a meeting,” Albert said, “I think Zak and she should become acquainted soon. Arranging it may be complicated, though, by the state of time on Terra. Leave it with me.”

“Albert, if you’re doing better with Zak than you did with Alex and me,” Alice asked, “can’t you just go back and do us again?”

“No.”

“Why not?”

“Can’t be done.”

“Why not?”

“It would take too long to explain.”

“Too long? Time is an allusion, remember? Isn’t that what you keep telling us? Come on, let’s step out of time and you can explain it to us.”

“Okay, I’ll tell you. The Eddies won’t allow it. It’s against the law, they say.”

“There are laws? Who knew? Whose laws?”

“That’s the thing. We don’t know. We are subject to the Eddies and they, it seems, are subject to a higher power.”

Just as Albert said those words, Madge stepped back into the room. “So there is a God!” she said.