Random Limericks 15

canstockphoto12290151300.jpg
© Can Stock Photo& damedeeso. Used with permission

A series of (non-acrostic) limericks produced in response to various prompts.

These will appear on Saturday mornings wherever possible.

Let me know what you think.

 

IMPIGNORATE

for Kristian – https://talesfromthemindofkristian.wordpress.com/2020/11/21/impignorate/

I’m starting to feel quite the fool
Finding words I did not learn in school.
This really does grate,
Impignorate
Means pawning – and that’s just not cool.

CANDLE

for Kristian – https://talesfromthemindofkristian.wordpress.com/2020/11/22/candle/

A candle is useful for light;
Quite subtle, they’re seldom too bright.
I often have four,
Sometimes even more,
Though four is enough for foresight.

FIGMENT

for Kristian – https://talesfromthemindofkristian.wordpress.com/2020/11/23/figment/

I seem to have quite a fixation
On hues and their constant mutation.
It seems that some pigments
Are no more than figments
Of my colourful imagination.

GOBBLE

for Kristian – https://talesfromthemindofkristian.wordpress.com/2020/11/24/gobble/

A turkey called John had a wobble
When throughout his flock came a squabble
They may think Thanksgiving
Essential to living
But it’s we who are meant to go ‘gobble’!

FOOTLOOSE

for Kristian – https://talesfromthemindofkristian.wordpress.com/2020/11/26/footloose/

My favourite film about dancing
Is one I found truly entrancing;
It’s Footloose for me,
It’s wild and it’s free;
But not when it came to financing!

FRENZY

for Kristian – https://talesfromthemindofkristian.wordpress.com/2020/11/27/frenzy/

With two feet three inches of beard
Some folk thought my friend was quite weird;
But the media frenzy
Around poor McKenzie
Affected him more than we’d feared.

 

Acrostic Limericks 22

canstockphoto12290151300.jpg
© Can Stock Photo & damedeeso used with permission

Many examples of acrostic poems can be found scattered around the web (where the first letter of each line spells out a word when read from top to bottom), but I have found very few examples of acrostic Limericks.

I now look out for prompts that contain five letters (or ten, fifteen or… let’s not get ahead of ourselves, eh?). I may add the odd one of my own, too.

Let me know what you think.

STUDY

For Esther (https://esthernewtonblog.wordpress.com/2020/11/23/laughing-along-with-a-limerick-34/)

Study as much as you need;
These urges I have to succeed,
Undeniably strong,
Don’t last very long.
You’ll still never see me concede.

Anyone care to join in?

Chance encounter

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“Do you recognise this place, Doreen?”

“Can’t honestly say I do. It’s not the sort of place I’d forget, is it? A great big church with a red door halfway up the wall and no steps to get to it.”

“You don’t remember coming here with me all those years ago?”

“Here? With you? Whatever for?”

“Try hard, Doreen. Think back to when you were a young woman.”

“I was much prettier then. Slimmer, too. Used to have a lovely figure, I did. My Stan used to reckon I could win a beauty contest if I’d wanted to. Could even have been Miss World. Couldn’t do that now, of course. Not unless there’s a special prize for the most wrinkles.”

“Who’s your Stan, when he’s around?”

“My Stan. My late husband.”

“What’s he late for?”

“Not late as in didn’t turn up on time; late as in dead.”

“Now I’m confused.”

You’re confused. Why?”

“Because I clearly remember standing at the front of the congregation in this church; a lot of years ago; and waiting for you to appear. When I saw you come through the back door with your father, I believed I’d never seen a lovelier sight in my entire life. I almost cried at your beauty.”

“Wuss.”

“I said almost. I didn’t actually cry.”

“Then what happened?”

“Then we got married. Then you became my wife, the first and so far the only Mrs Albert Bagshaw whom, incidentally, I don’t recall seeing these past ten years.”

“Who’s Albert Bagshaw?”

“I am, Doreen.”

“So how come I don’t know you? And why do you keep calling me Doreen? My name’s Ethel.”

“Oh, sorry. My mistake. It must have been two other people.”

“Okay. Nice to meet you, Albert.”

“You too, Ethel. There’s a café across the road. Fancy a cuppa?”

“Love one. Perhaps we can get to know each other.”

“That’d be nice…”

This was written in response to Kreative Kue 290 published on this site.